Logo

How to play Dota Underlords: Info for Battle Pass owners

Dota 2

Valve sprung a surprise on Thursday with the release of its own, official version of Auto Chess - Dota Underlords.

The game will be available on PC, Mac and Linux AND on iOS and Android but if you're wondering how to play Dota Underlords now, it's pretty simple - all you have to do is buy the TI9 Battle Pass.

Yep, unsurprisingly, Valve has found yet another way to push the battle pass - not that it really needs to, with this year's sales already set to smash previous records.

How to play Dota Underlords now

The game has been open to friend and family testing for the last few weeks. Valve decided yesterday to make it available to all Battle Pass owners for further testing in an official statement.

The open beta is set to start but Valve did not mention any starting date or appeal to the community for feedback. It left fans asking how to play Dota Underlords now for weeks but now the wait is over.

dota2_underlords

If you want to play Dota Underlords now, you then will have to buy a Dota 2 Battlepass or wait for the open beta, when it will be available on Steam and via Apple and Android stores.

If you've already played Auto Chess for a while, then learning how to play Dota Underlords should be relatively easy.

TI9 Battle Pass price structure:

  • Standard (24 levels) - $9.99
  • Level 50 - $29.35
  • Level 100 - $44.99

lb-generic-article_100-1

Valve placing chess pieces

Drodo studio with their fantastic idea opened the Dota 2 world to thousands of new more players with more than 8 millions unique suscribers and between 100,000 and 200,000 concurrent players reported 2 months ago. Newzoo reported a 23% boost to the Dota 2 player base only due to Autochess at the same period too. Did and will Valve involve Drodo Studio in the making of their new title? As gamers and developpers, we can only hope Drodo Studio will reap the benefits of their own fantastic innovation.

GGMote and Pleistoanax from our Discord community both agree to rate the situation as unfair to Drodo Studio given what they brought to the community. But if Valve can manage to exceed players' expectations in terms of fun and innovation, players' compassion and gratefulness for Dota Auto Chess creators Drodo Studio might not translate into success given the resources and company they are facing.

Drodo's Epic contribution

The gaming world and esports environment are used to crazy success stories and innovation, but they are also used to aborted, overthought or wasted projects that initially looked like revolutions. Is what we can already call the 'auto chess' genre going to bubble and fade away or is it here to stay? With the Dota Underlords open beta around the corner and other developers eyeing to make their own versions, it looks like the Battle Royale genre has found a fierce competitor.

The innovation is so big that Drodo Studio got propelled in a chat with the American giant company Valve that did not end as expected, we can only speculate, in spite of a slick but contradictory statement.

"We had great conversations, but we both came to the conclusion that Valve and Drodo could not work directly with each other for a variety of reasons. We ended up agreeing that we’ll each build our own stand-alone version of the game, and support each other to the fullest," Dota 2 Blog. May 21, 2019.

It emerged on June 10 that Drodo Studio was, in fact, working with Fortnite creator Epic Games to release a version of Auto Chess independently of Valve.

A question comes directly into mind when reading that statement, how can both entities support each other to the fullest if they go both for different versions of the same game?

Talk it out

More than a player base, Drodo studio invented a new genre every game developping company is already eyeing to exploit.

Have you already played Dota Underlords? Come share your experience with our fun Dota 2 community. Still grinding Auto Chess? Come find mates to play with there too.

CAB_4

Felix CharlesSpent seven years as a poker game integrity and poker community manager at PokerStars and most recently worked as a freelance correspondent and consultant for various companies.